Slaty-backed Gull

My first lifer of 2009 was a Slaty-backed Gull that has been hanging out in downtown Portland lately. It was a pretty painless twitch on the lifelist; 1. learn about the bird from email   2. drive downtown and find a parking space   3. find the gull standing on a light on the Broadway Bridge   4. ka-ching!

slaty-backed-gull

While I didn’t have to work very hard for this particular bird, it takes a well-earned spot on my list. I have been studying gulls rather intently for several years, learning to recognize the common species. (One needs to be familiar with the common birds if you want to recognize a rarity when you see one.) Slaty-backed has been very high on my want-list for two reasons. First, it is normally found in Asia, so it is hard to find in Oregon. Second, several years ago I thought I had found one, only to learn that I had made an identification error. While the incident was rather embarrassing (I immediately reported the bird, as I should have.) it did provide a valuable opportunity to learn what a Slaty-backed Gull really should look like.

westernxglaucous-winged2

This is the bird that got me excited a few years ago. It is actually a third-cycle WesternXGlaucous-winged hybrid. It bears some similarities to a Slaty-backed, but the mantle is too light, the markings on the head are too evenly mottled, and the bill is too fat and bulbous. The pale eye on this bird is unusual, adding to my confusion. While many birders pointed out my error, one actually explained why this wasn’t a Slaty-backed Gull, providing me with a great boost in my gull identification skills.

slaty-backed-dance

So while I didn’t need a lot of luck or effort to see this particular bird, seeing it provided a bit of closure for one facet of my birding development. Thus I join this third-cycle Slaty-backed Gull in the Happy Dance to celebrate another tick on the life list.

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This entry was posted in birding technique, identification challenges, rarities, species profile and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Slaty-backed Gull

  1. Laura says:

    I like the progression from #1 to #4….Mark and I had the same experience! I guess I’m an official twitcher now.

  2. Michele says:

    Congrats John! I too someday will be that excited about gulls I am sure.

  3. denise schmit says:

    Took a brief visit to the Burnside Bridge this morning, 3/31/09, to try to spot the slaty-backed gull. Did not visit the Broadway Bridge.
    Any viewings of this in the last few days? If so, where? Has he/she migrated out of Portland already?

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