Random Images

Here are a few photos from recent ramblings.

kestrel 2After delivering some books to Tualatin River NWR, I took a quick walk on the path that leads through some newly planted oaks and along the river. This male American Kestrel had just captured a shrew.

waterfowlThese Western Canada Geese (and the Common Merganser on the log in the foreground) were napping at the Sandy River Delta.

beaver chewThe Beavers are really enjoying the young trees at Sandy River Delta.

IMG_6001This old American Robin nest was tucked into a crevice of a tree.

pileatedPileated Woodpeckers are fairly easy to find at Sandy River Delta. This one was perfectly hidden behind a branch.

peregrine 2Peregrine Falcon, Sandy River Delta

hermit thrushThis Hermit Thrush was chasing another outside my bedroom window early in the morning.

Sandy River Delta

chat singingI took Nala to the Sandy River Delta this week. One of the target birds for this area is Yellow-breasted Chat, a species hard to find elsewhere in the Portland area.
chat turnedThis was the only individual I found that day, but new migrants are arriving daily. Willow Flycatchers and Eastern Kingbirds, two other specialties of this site, were largely absent during my visit, but were reported a few days later.

IMG_4762Lazuli Buntings are back in force and singing on territory.

common yellowthroatCommon Yellowthroat

IMG_4757Savannah Sparrow, in harsh sunlight. One of these days I will learn how to photograph in such conditions.

pileatedWe often associate Pileated Woodpeckers with dense forest, but this species is often found on isolated cottonwood trees along the Columbia River.

Slow Spring

The end of March and beginning of April have been cool and wet. Spring is progressing, but seemingly very slowly. Here are a few images from the past week.

pacific wren frontPacific Wrens are singing everywhere. This bird was at Powell Butte Nature Park in SE Portland.

savannah sparrow frontSavannah Sparrows are staking out their territories in the grassland at the top of Powell Butte.
savannah sparrow side

ruddy duckThis Ruddy Duck at Vanport Wetlands is sporting his spring colors.

pileated woodpecker 2This Pileated Woodpecker is excavating a cavity at Tualatin Hills Nature Park. Thanks to Michele for sharing the location of this nest.
pileated woodpecker 3

common garterThis tiny Common Garter was also at Tualatin Hills.

townsend's chipmunkAs was this Townsend’s Chipmunk.

nala frontNala is far more interested in fetching sticks from the river than looking at birds. This “stick” in the Columbia is probably her biggest to date.
nala back

 

 

Smith and Bybee Wetlands 24 Oct. 2013

wf geese duoThe morning at Smith and Bybee Wetlands in northwest Portland started out foggy. At the Smith Lake canoe launch, 12 Greater White-fronted Geese were among the many waterfowl. It is getting late for White-fronts in the Willamette Valley.

waxwing 1There were a lot of Cedar Waxwings flycatching and feeding on various fruiting trees. This is a young bird, given the overall scruffy appearance and the lack of red tips on the tertials.

pileatedThis Pileated Woodpecker was very vocal and perched out in the open on a distant utility pole.

rs hawkThis Red-shouldered Hawk was among the many Red-tailed Hawks and Northern Harriers present on the property.

marsh wren front 1The current low water levels allow you to hike quite a ways out into the wetlands. Marsh Wrens are common in the shrubs and reed canary grass.
marsh wren side 2

song sparrowSong Sparrows are also common in the tall grasses. The best bird of the day was a Swamp Sparrow, but he eluded the camera.

frog 3Pacific Chorus Frogs were singing everywhere, but this is the only individual I could see.

Pileated Woodpeckers excavating

Our warm spring weather has deteriorated into windy, cold, rain-and-snow-mixed squalls. Such weather brings on cabin fever rather quickly. So in an effort to avoid total psychosis, I bundled up and headed for Tualatin Hills Nature Park in Beaverton. Aside from the cheery singing from both Bewick’s and Winter Wrens, the highlight of the trip was a pair of Pileated Woodpeckers excavating a nest cavity.

pileated-male.jpg
I first saw the male, pecking away inside the cavity and occasionally hauling out a clump of chips in his bill

pileated-pair.jpg
The female soon joined the male, and did a little excavating after he flew off.

pileated-cavity.jpg
Here is the cavity. Notice how the lower edge is beveled, just like the cavities of Black-backed and American Three-toed Woodpeckers. The oval shape, and the lack of other excavation nearby, suggests this is a nesting cavity. Cavities produced by feeding Pileateds are usually rectangular.