North Coast

sceneI made two trips to the coast this week, once to scout for my Portland Audubon shorebird class, and again for the class itself. It is amazing how much difference a couple of days can make in the make-up of bird life in a given area. On Thursday, I found a total of 11 shorebirds of two species. During the class we found hundreds of individuals of 10 species. I am so glad it was not the other way around. This is the view from the Necanicum River Estuary, looking south. The tiny bump in the middle is Haystack Rock, about 12 miles away.

whimbrel leftWhimbrel, Necanicum Estuary
whimbrel right
caspian ternCaspian Terns are common and very vocal all along the coast.

elkElk, Necanicum Estuary

semipalmated ploverThis Semipalmated Plover was the only shorebird at the tidal ponds at Fort Stevens.

raccoonRaccoon, on the mudflats near Parking Lot D, Fort Stevens (with a Caspian Tern and a California Gull)

ruddy turnstoneThis is one of two Ruddy Turnstones we found with a flock of Black Turnstones at the Seaside Cove.

white-crowned sparrowWhite-crowned Sparrow, Necanicum Estuary

california ground squirrelCalifornia Ground Squirrel, Hammond Boat Basin

faded gullHere is a good example of why this time of year may not be the best for learning gull ID. The plumage on this gull is bleached out and very worn. Judging from the size, shape, and pink legs on this bird (next to a normal non-breeding California Gull) I’m guessing this is a Glaucous-winged Gull, perhaps in his second cycle. I hope he grows some new feathers soon, or it will be a very cold autumn and winter.

Ridgefield NWR

I don’t get up to Ridgefield NWR in Washington very often, even though it is a short drive from Portland. But lots of folks had recently seen adorable fuzzy little Virginia Rail babies, so I wanted to try my luck.

IMG_7595By the time I got there, the adorable fuzzy little babies had become rather unattractive adolescents, but it was still fun to see this usually shy species out in the open.
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IMG_7618Another adolescent foraging near the rails was this little Nutria. The refuge staff tries to control the population of this introduced species, but they remain plentiful.
nutria

northern harrierNorthern Harrier

IMG_7583Black-tailed Deer, perfectly hidden among the teasel

IMG_7591There is not a lot of water on the refuge right now, so the Great Egrets were gathered on one of the remaining ponds.

IMG_7581We are entering Ugly Duck Season, when adult ducks molt into identical ratty plumages, making them much harder to identify. I am going with Cinnamon Teal on this mama and babies (all-black bill, overall warm brown coloring).

IMG_7622On the way home we stopped at Kelly Point Park along the Columbia River in NW Portland. California Gulls were gathered on the pilings.

IMG_7623This young American Crow (note the pinkish gape) was begging for food.

IMG_7627Nala, the large aquatic mammal.

Fernhill Wetlands and Jackson Bottom

We are two weeks into a nasty heat wave in the Portland area. Sunrise is the only time of day when you can bird in any comfort and hope to find any birds active and singing. So I got up early and did a bird survey at Fernhill, then made a quick stop at Jackson Bottom on the way home.

am. goldfinchSome of the flowers have gone to seed, providing forage for both American (above) and Lesser (below) Goldfinches.

lesser goldfinch
great blueThe refurbished wetlands at Fernhill have lots of tree trunks installed vertically to provide perches for birds like this Great Blue Heron.

green heronGreen Heron

downyThis Downy Woodpecker was checking out some of the new plantings around the water garden at Fernhill.

killdeera young Killdeer, at that awkward teenager stage

spotted sandpiper leftSpotted Sandpipers are the other shorebird that nests at Fernhill and Jackson.

spotted sandpiper upChecking the sky for falcons

garterThis Common Garter Snake was very thick in the middle. I assume she is gravid. Garters give birth starting in late July. Broods are typically around a dozen, but broods of over 80 young have been reported.

tree swallowmale Tree Swallow, being all sparkly

Tilley Jane Trail

trail 5I walked the Tilley Jane trail on the east side of Mt. Hood. This trail starts near the Cooper Spur Ski Area and goes about two and a half miles up to the Tilley Jane Campground.

trail 1Much of the trail goes through an area that burned a few years ago, so there are lots of standing dead trees and wildflowers.

flickerBurned areas are great for woodpeckers and other cavity nesters. This is a young Northern Flicker that was peeking out of her nest hole.

olive-sided flycatcherOlive-sided Flycatcher

juncoDark-eyed Junco. Yes, I can see them out my living room window, but they look better on the mountain.

deer 2We came upon this Black-tailed Deer nursing her new fawn. If the fawn had been hidden, I think the doe would have taken off. But since the baby was exposed, they both just froze as we passed by.

golden-mantled ground squirrel 1This Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel looks like she might be carrying a litter.
golden-mantled ground squirrel
m in lupinesCharismatic megafauna among the lupines

cassin's finchAt higher elevations, Cassin’s Finches became common, if not cooperative.

pacific fritillary 1Along with the wildflowers are butterflies. The flowers are interesting in person, but not so much in photos. A few butterflies, like this Pacific Fritillary, posed for good looks.

persius duskywing 1This is a Persius Duskywing, which I had never heard of before.

trail 4

 

Tualatin River NWR

eagle nest Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge is still a fairly new addition to the Willamette Valley refuge complex, but it offers a nice variety of habitats very close to Portland. I don’t know if the resident Bald Eagles had a successful nesting this year, but this individual was hanging out by the nest during my recent visit.

cinnamon teal 1Cinnamon Teal were conspicuous, but Blue-winged and Green-winged Teal were also present.

killdeer 1Killdeer and Spotted Sandpipers are both common nesters on the refuge.

n. rough-winged 1The air above the wetlands is filled with various species of swallows. This Northern Rough-winged Swallow was the only one that sat for a distant photo.

willow flycatcher 1This Willow Flycatcher was giving his distinctive “FITZ-bew” call.

w. wood-pewee 1Western Wood-Pewees were calling from the edges of the woods.

savannah sparrow 1The grassy areas are home to Savannah Sparrows.

white-crowned 1This White-crowned Sparrow was singing from the roof of the refuge office.

Smith and Bybee Wetlands

cliff swallow 1Nesting season is in full swing at Smith and Bybee Wetlands in northwest Portland. There is a small colony of Cliff Swallows nesting under the highway overpass.

waxwing nestHere is the tail end of a Cedar Waxwing sitting on a nest. This seems like an awfully large nest for such a small bird.

waxwing raiding nestSeveral Cedar Waxwings were raiding nesting material from this Bushtit nest. I hope the Bushtits were done with it.

waxwing with fruitCedar Waxwing with fruit

song sparrow 2This Sparrow was carrying a mouthful of bugs, indicating that she had a nest of babies nearby.

marsh wren 1Marsh Wrens were actively singing in several locations.
marsh wren 3

cowbirdBrown-headed Cowbird

gb heronGreat Blue Heron on Smith Lake

turtlesThe warm sun brought the reptiles out in good numbers. Smith and Bybee is a stronghold for the threatened Western Painted Turtle.

garter 3Northwestern Garter Snakes were also enjoying the sun. Northwestern Garters are distinguished from Common Garters by their smaller head and gentler disposition.
garter 1

Sandy River Delta

IMG_7181Nala and I spent several hours hiking (and swimming) at the Sandy River Delta. Local nesters, like this Common Yellowthroat, were busy gather food for nestlings.

IMG_7198Male Lazuli Buntings were very vocal, and seemed to be vying for the attention of the females (below).
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IMG_7175Osprey flying along the Columbia River

IMG_7163This Western Canada Goose had an unusual head pattern, with white reaching across the forehead and around the nape.

IMG_7215Rufous Hummingbirds were defending their blackberry patches.